Reluctant Revolution

Capitalism has only succeeded to the extent it has because it inherently recognizes the most fundamental quality of our nature: greed. In this, capitalism is the most authentic of “isms”; yet even it is not immune to empire-crushing corruption.

The very economic system that fuels democracy in America has provided me with financial gain beyond my ability while simultaneously dispiriting me to such an extent that I cannot help but quietly wish for its demise. The greater the evidence of corporate malfeasance and political ineptitude, the greater my admiration for the nascent revolution taking place on Wall Street where thousands of disenfranchised Americans approach a fortnight of protest against capitalism gone awry.

Mind you, I’m far from what you would call an anarchist. Quite the opposite in fact. I’m an intransigent conformist who ought to know better, given all that I know. But these days I’m finding most “ists,” “isms” and “ologies” increasingly uncomfortable to wear out in public as humans have the unique ability to deform even the purest of ideological intentions. Any organized system that seeks to harness the natural tendencies of humankind is destined to eventually suffocate under the weight of its own construct.

Capitalism has only succeeded to the extent it has because it inherently recognizes the most fundamental quality of our nature: greed. In this, capitalism is the most authentic of “isms”; yet even it is not immune to empire-crushing corruption.

Capitalism can only thrive within a democracy that cradles, coddles and spoon-feeds free enterprise with regulations that govern conduct. It’s this necessity that is lost upon my libertarian friends who seek to abolish anything that would impede free markets and entrepreneurs as though successful Americans weren’t aided by laws that protect their ideas and property, infrastructure that allows the passage of trade and trustworthy currency with which to transact. The phantasmic and magical world of radical Ayn Rand sycophants flourishes in storybooks but founders in history books.

Likewise, capitalism has been the engine of democracy, allowing the formation of a legal structure that, while imperfect, is still the envy of the world. So, too, has it funded a government of disproportionate militaristic might that American hegemony is unrivaled to the point that any chink in our armor can and will be strictly by our own hand. In this, the Project for a New American Century has already been fully realized. Read into this what you will.

So what of the fearless cadre of would-be revolutionaries who are raging against the machine in the belly of the beast on Wall Street? What is to become of us if they are somehow successful in forcing us to look in the mirror and utter aloud treasonous words that would question our collective morality and therefore our patriotism? Imagining the almost unthinkable collapse of capitalism inevitably brings to life the words of Mao Tse-Tung, who pondered this fate and concluded that “humanity left to its own does not necessarily re-establish capitalism, but it does re-establish inequality.”

History is rife with philosopher-kings who have cautioned against unadulterated capitalism and promulgated the need for the equal and opposite influence of regulations and morality to counter the natural forces within us.

It’s why I struggle to wholly align myself with the notion that all we have known must turn to dust if we are to rebuild a robust and equitable, yet competitive future for America. Though as much as I despise the oil oligarchs, banking miscreants and neocons who have hijacked our nation, I am not yet ready to light a match, gather the animals two-by-two and select a few beautiful people with whom to breed and repopulate the planet.

I am, however, as in touch with my inner-Tyler Durden and Chris Hedges as I am with Henry Thoreau and H.L. Mencken. The former inform my understanding that the democracy we live in today is perverted beyond recognition while the latter offer a healthy mix of civil disobedience and cynicism. The result is perhaps a quixotic optimism, a belief that we can still exact a proper balance between economy, ecology and morality. Because if I am to accept that the propagation of inequity is in our DNA, then why start over? Or as my friend Dorian would say: Completely abandoning our version of democracy and capitalism in order to discover our inherent morality is like “burning down the barn to get to the nails.”

Therefore, I continue trying to define what exactly is fundamentally wrong with our economic system today. I offer the following points for your consideration. They are strictly economic measures that would restore balance and sanity to the markets, not some high-minded, socially conscious dreams for a peaceful Utopia. But make no mistake: Absent some or all of the reforms listed here, I truly believe the revolution is nigh.

Author: Jed Morey

Jed Morey is the publisher of the Long Island Press, LI's Cultural Arts and Investigative News Journal. The Press has a monthly circulation of 100,000, and www.longislandpress.com, welcomes more than 500,000 unique visitors every month. He serves on the board of the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center in Nassau County, as well as the President's Council of Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Long Island. In addition to the contributions on this blog, Morey authors a column for the Long Island Press titled "Off The Reservation" and is a staunch advocate for Indian rights. The column was voted Best Column in New York by the NY Press Association in 2010 and third overall in the nation among alternative publications by the Association of Alternative Weeklies in 2012. Morey lives in Glen Cove with his wife, Eden White, and their two daughters.

1 thought on “Reluctant Revolution”

  1. Jed:

    I agree that “oil oligarchs, banking miscreants and neocons…have hijacked our nation,” but the loss of an independent media has also cost this nation dearly. Nearly 40 years ago Kate Graham willingly risked getting “her tit caught in a ringer” in order to empower her editorial staff to bring down an Imperial President. Back then reporters reported on government officials and business leaders. Now they attend the same dinner parties and everybody gets along just fine.

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